MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Memphis police said they have arrested a man in connection with a shooting that killed two people in North Memphis on Monday, and a cell phone helped lead police to the suspect.

Police said the two people were killed outside a home on the 2000 block of Eldridge from apparent gunshot wounds. The man and a woman were inside a red Pontiac Grand Prix, and they were pronounced dead on the scene by Memphis Fire Department.

Police noted 32 spent 9mm shell casings on the ground outside the vehicle as well as a black cell phone left on the ground.

Police obtained a search warrant for the phone found at the scene. After analysis, they determined that the phone belonged to a Jacquez Howell.

Memphis Police reviewed video surveillance footage and found a dark colored Nissan Maxima with a damaged right rear panel parked behind the Pontiac Grand Prix.

Police said the Nissan Maxima drove down Eldridge and stopped in the middle of the road. Police reported that the Maxima’s passenger-side window opens and what appears to be smoke in the air came from the Pontiac Grand Prix.

Two days later, MPD spotted a damaged blue Nissan Maxima that matched the description of the car seen on Eldridge.

Police said they attempted to pull over the vehicle to perform a traffic stop, but the driver refused to stop or pull over. They pursued him until the 1000 block of Mendenhall.

Howell, whose cell phone had been found at the Eldridge crime scene, was the driver. Officers said they pursued Howell until he bailed out of the vehicle and ran. Police pursued on foot and caught him off Macon Road.

After arresting Howell, MPD searched his car and checked the vehicle’s identification. They noted there was a firearm in plain view on the center console. Police said that it was a model XD9 Springfield 9mm handgun. It was loaded with 13 rounds and one in the chamber.

Police ran the VIN number of the vehicle, and it turned out that it was reported stolen on July 17.

Memphis Police said they interviewed Howell, and he admitted to stealing the Nissan on Sept. 11. Police said they showed him pictures of the victims in the homicides, and he confirmed that he knew one of them.

Police pressed him on the cell phone, but Howell said he had lost his phone two months earlier. Police said they asked Howell how his phone managed to be at the location of a homicide, and he said he didn’t know how it got there.

According to records, Howell is currently facing two charges of first-degree murder, theft of property, evading arrest, resisting arrest and unlawful possession of a weapon.